Hotel style hospitality service at a hospice

Before the introduction of the hospitality service at St Luke’s Hospice, Sheffield, it was the responsibility of nursing staff to order and serve meals to patients. Ordering and delivery of meals was fragmented and interruptions during the meal service could occur due to conflicting clinical commitments. This could cause food to be left on trolleys for periods of time whilst nurses assisted patients.
 
There was also a patient demand for more flexibility for when and where meals were served and how family and visitors of patients were accommodated. The previous hospitality service may have lacked imagination, as much of the food was prepared in bulk from frozen food stock. There was a demand for a larger variety of food of higher quality.

The hospice decided that the introduction of a new hospitality service with added staff would enable a number of improvements that would:
release nursing time to directly focus attention on patients rather than tasks
target key indicators to improve direct care, in this case nutrition
improve communication between all members of the multidisciplinary team (MDT)
enhance patient and family experiences
 
This project follows the ethos of NHS quality initiatives such as the Productive Series and the QIPP agenda.(1)(2)
Key points
  • St Luke’s Hospice, Sheffield, identified a need for change in their hospitality service in order to release nursing time and to provide a better meal service.
  • Hotel style hospitality was chosen to provide a personalised service offering freshly made food.
  • The change has reduced the cost of food, improved the quality of the meal service and released time to allow nurses to focus on patient care.

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