Community Volunteering hub

The Community Volunteering hub offers information and support for hospices about launching and improving their community volunteer programmes.

1_Community-Volunteering-Hub

What is Community Volunteering? 

The last few years have seen some very significant changes in hospice volunteering as volunteers have become increasingly involved in the direct support of people with palliative and end of life care (PEOLC) needs in the community, along with their families and carers.

This resource hub is informed by evidence gathered from a survey of hospice community volunteering undertaken by Hospice UK

For the purposes of the resource, community volunteering is defined as "volunteering undertaken out with the hospice building, directly supporting people with palliative and end of life care needs in their homes."

Benefits of Community Volunteering

Findings in the Analysis Report suggest that community volunteering has many benefits to people with PEOLC needs, families and carers, staff, organisations and volunteers.

People with PEOLC needs Families/carers Staff and organisations Volunteers
Reduction in isolation through companionship  Respite from caring
Better understanding of the needs of people with PEOLC needs and their families
Personal development/ experience for employment,
Improved wellbeing Reduction in isolation through companionship 
Stronger connection to the community
Giving back – making a difference
Improved access to services
Improved wellbeing
  Sense of purpose and fulfilment
Better care Improved access to services
  Improved health and wellbeing

Create a Community Volunteering Programme

 

Delivering the programme

4_CV-Delivering-the-programme
Get more information and resources >


Monitoring  and evaluation

6_CV-Monitoring-and-evaluation
Measure outcomes >


Read the Analysis Report 

8_CV-Analysis-Report
Read the Analysis Report in full >

Language and terminology

Throughout the project we have been very aware of language and the influence that words can have on the relationship between people.

In many of the community volunteering programmes the emphasis is on 'doing with' rather than 'doing to', and the principle underpinning this resource is that volunteers, people with end of life care needs, families and carers are partners in the relationship, each meeting and responding to one another as individuals. 

For this reason the resource intentionally does not use the term 'patient' but talks about 'a person/people with palliative and end of life care (PEOLC) needs.'

The word 'patient' only appears when used in quotes or case studies.

Further resources

The development of Neighbourhood Network in Palliative Care (Kerala)

Paleri, A., Sallnow, L. (2018) Volunteering in Hospice and Palliative Care in India In: Scott R, Howlett S, editors. The changing face of volunteering in hospice and palliative care: an international perspective (pp157-169). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

The development of Compassionate Neighbours

Sallnow. L., Richardson, H. (2018) and Community In: Scott R, Howlett S, editors. The changing face of volunteering in hospice and palliative care: an international perspective (pp157-169). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Exploring experiences of compassionate communities

Wegleitner, K., Heimerl, K., Kellehear, A. (2016) Compassionate Communities Case studies from Britain and Europe. Abingdon: Routledge

An overview of the development of compassionate communities in England.

Volunteering and community development

Volunteering Now (2011) The Role of Volunteering as an Integral Part of Community Development in Northern Ireland.


What does hospice care mean to you?