Conferences and learning events resource centre

Browse presentations from our retail, clinical and annual conferences, and from some learning events.

The resource centre gives you access to presentations, documents and videos, where available, from our main conferences and learning events.

Use ‘Choose category’ to browse presentations from a particular type of event. ‘Keyword’ searching will find results from any of the events. These resources are from conferences or learning events, which have taken place from 2014 onwards.

select
  • Nov 28, 2018
    7.5 Conference papers. Engaging patients and the wider public - Patient and Public Involvement (PPI): contributions to palliative care research
    Dr Clare Gardiner, Research Fellow, University of Sheffield This session included presentation of three abstracts submitted via the call for papers. The abstracts are reproduced in a conference supplement published by BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care, an official journal of Hospice UK.
  • Nov 28, 2018
    Parallel sessions 7 - 7.1 Diversity in governance: what can it do for your hospice and how to achieve it
    In this session Kai Adams, who leads the Charities and Social Enterprise practice at Green Park Interim & Executive Search, explored the current relevance of diversity and inclusion in a board setting. He examined diversity that is both visible and invisible, inherited and acquired, physical and cognitive and look at why it is important – not just as another in a long list of board priorities, but as a solution to many of the challenges facing the sector. Based on examples from his career as a headhunter, Kai offered practical advice on how to develop a proposition that will help to attract diverse candidates, provide tips on recruitment and retention, and highlight the many advantages of a diverse and complementary board. Geoff Pringle, Chair of Trustees for Hospiscare in Exeter, described his trustees’ commitment to ensure that their board represents the community it serves. Geoff talked about age diversity and how Hospiscare went about recruiting a ‘young’ trustee.
  • Nov 28, 2018
    Parallel sessions 7 - 7.4 Hard earned, easily lost: Your hospice’s reputation and how to manage it
    It is vital for hospices to be able to respond quickly and proactively to prevent an issue escalating into a crisis. In this session, we will explore why reputation management is a major strategic issue facing senior teams and trustees alike. Two hospice chief executives shared top tips from tricky situations they have handled and Hospice UK shared information on how they can support your contingency planning for crisis communications.
  • Nov 28, 2018
    7.5 Conference papers. Engaging patients and the wider public - End of life care and decision-making: public knowledge, needs and preference in Wales
    Dr Ishrat Islam, Research Associate, Marie Curie Palliative Care Research Centre, School of Medicine,Cardiff University This session included presentation of three abstracts submitted via the call for papers. The abstracts are reproduced in a conference supplement published by BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care, an official journal of Hospice UK.
  • Nov 28, 2018
    Plenary session 4 Death stories: truth and consolation
    We live in an age that has lost its understanding of death. A process that was once recognised, acknowledged and accompanied has become a place of loneliness, dread and fear. The fear feeds reluctance to talk; and reluctance to talk holds help at bay. In the palliative care professions, we are addressing this fear one patient at a time, one family at a time. But what if the public perception could be changed? What if we could restore the forgotten wisdom of the deathbed? It’s time to talk about dying. Not just amongst ourselves; not only at our conferences and in our learned journals. It’s time for a public conversation. For centuries, we have used storytelling to deal with the Big Issues: life, death, transcendence, power, vulnerability. Before we leave conference, let’s think about telling stories. How can we distil the truth into a format that brings normal dying out of the darkness? How do we tell the story of dying in a world that turns away?
  • Nov 28, 2018
    Parallel sessions 7 - 7.2 Dementia: The role of hospices in bridging the gap
    In this session, Michael Verde, founder of Memory Bridge: The Foundation for Alzheimer’s and Cultural Memory, and Liz Bryan, director of education and training at St Christopher’s, used extracts from the documentary ‘Love is Listening: Dementia Without Loneliness’ to consider the role of hospices in changing societal attitudes towards people with dementia. The film, produced in collaboration with Michael Verde and world-renowned solo percussionist Evelyn Glennie, documents how, by using her extraordinary awareness of non-verbal communication, Evelyn was able to make an emotionally profound connections with individuals who many might consider to be beyond meaningful reach.
  • Nov 28, 2018
    7.5 Conference papers. Engaging patients and the wider public - Lights, camera, action: the story behind the scenes of ‘The Hospice’
    Cheri Strudwick, Head of Marketing and Communications, ellenor This session included presentation of three abstracts submitted via the call for papers. The abstracts are reproduced in a conference supplement published by BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care, an official journal of Hospice UK.
  • Nov 28, 2018
    Parallel sessions 7 - 7.3 How to use young people’s voices to improve palliative care for everyone
    This workshop was for anyone whose service engages with children and young people – as service users, visitors or volunteers. It gave participants the skills to: • Listen to children and young people • Capture their views creatively • Use what they say to improve your service Participants left energised, inspired and motivated to utilise young people’s feedback in a creative way.
  • Nov 28, 2018
    Parallel sessions 6 - 6.1 As seen on TV: What we learnt from taking part in a television documentary series
    ellenor took part in ‘The Hospice’, a 13-part television documentary series which was transmitted on the Together TV channel in the summer of 2018. The aim of the series was to tell the story of hospice care, across all ages, to enable a wider audience to understand what we do and the difference we make as a sector. The session covered the various aspects of the project, from original inception, through the filming process, and afterwards when it aired. A number of key strands will provided a useful insight into the logistics of the project: how the filming was managed and how stories were chosen to be featured; how we assessed the risks and ensured that all participants were treated sensitively and appropriately; how we managed the communications and PR; and the aftercare for families whose stories were featured when the series eventually aired. The project needed a collaborative multi-disciplinary team approach, with a number of departments and key individuals playing a significant role in ensuring success. The series was well-received and successful, and the aim of the session, which will be relevant to the wider hospice community, was to share its impact and what we learnt from the process.
  • Nov 28, 2018
    6.5 Conference papers. Care settings and service design - How do hospices facilitate social support?
    Natasha Bradley, PhD Candidate, University of Liverpool This session included presentation of four abstracts submitted via the call for papers. The abstracts are reproduced in a conference supplement published by BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care, an official journal of Hospice UK.

What does hospice care mean to you?